Ib French B Hl Written Assignments

Posted on by Gur

External assessment

Two different methods are used to assess students.

  • Detailed markschemes specific to each examination paper
  • Assessment criteria

The assessment criteria are published in this guide. They are related to the assessment objectives established for the language B courses and the group 2 aims.

For paper 1, there are markschemes.

For paper 2, there are assessment criteria.

For the written assignment, there are assessment criteria.

Written examination papers

Two examination papers are set and marked externally—paper 1 and paper 2. They are designed to allow students to demonstrate their competencies in relation to the language B assessment objectives. Paper 1 assesses receptive skills and paper 2 assesses productive skills.

Written assignment

Students are required to complete a written assignment that is produced under supervised conditions in the classroom and is assessed externally. The word limit for the written assignment at SL is 300–400 words, plus a 100-word rationale, and at HL is 500–600 words, plus a 150-word rationale.

Use of dictionaries and reference material

In papers 1 and 2, the use of dictionaries and reference material is not permitted during the examination. Students are allowed to use dictionaries and reference material for the written assignment.

Word count

Paper 2 SL: Students are required to write a minimum of 250 words.

Paper 2 HL, section A: Students are required to write a minimum of 250 words.

Paper 2 HL, section B: Students are required to write a minimum of 150 words.

Failure to write the minimum number of words will result in 1 mark being deducted from criterion A: language. (See the section “Language-specific information” in the appendices for information on languages that do not use the Roman alphabet.)

Written assignment SL: Students are required to adhere to a word limit of 300–400 words, plus a 100-word rationale. Students who fail to write the minimum number of words or who exceed the maximum will be deducted 1 mark from criterion A: language. If the word limit is exceeded, the assessment will be based on the first 400 words and the rationale.

Written assignment HL: Students are required to adhere to a word limit of 500–600 words, plus a 150-word rationale. Students who fail to write the minimum number of words or who exceed the maximum will be deducted 1 mark from criterion A: language. If the word limit is exceeded, the assessment will be based on the first 600 words and the rationale.

The three externally assessed components (paper 1, paper 2 and the written assignment) combine to give 70% of the assessment total.

Note: All responses, written and oral, must be in the target language.

Guidance and authenticity

The written assignment that is submitted for external assessment must be the student’s own work. However, students should decide upon a title or topic for the written assignment with advice and support from the teacher. The teacher should play an important role during the planning stage. It is the responsibility of the teacher to ensure that students are familiar with:

  • the requirements of the written assignment
  • the assessment criteria.

Students must understand that the work submitted for the written assignment must address the assessment criteria effectively.

It is the responsibility of teachers to ensure that all students understand the basic meaning and significance of concepts that relate to academic honesty, especially authenticity and intellectual property. Teachers must ensure that all student work for assessment is prepared according to the requirements and must explain clearly to students that the work must be entirely their own.

All work submitted to the IB for moderation or assessment must be authenticated by a teacher, and must not include any known instances of suspected or confirmed malpractice. Each student must sign the coversheet to confirm that the work is his or her authentic work and constitutes the final version of that work. Once a student has officially submitted the final version of the work to a teacher (or the coordinator) for assessment, together with the signed coversheet, it cannot be retracted.

Authenticity may be checked by discussion with the student on the content of the work, and by scrutiny of one or more of the following:

  • the references cited
  • the style of writing compared with work known to be that of the student.

The requirement for teachers and students to sign the coversheet applies to the work of all students. If the teacher and student sign a coversheet, but there is a comment to the effect that the work may not be authentic, the student will not be eligible for a mark in that component and no grade will be awarded. For further details, refer to the IB publication Academic honesty and the relevant articles in the General regulations: Diploma Programme.

External assessment details—SL

Paper 1: Receptive skills

Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Weighting: 25%

Paper 1 is based on the core: communication and media, global issues, social relationships.

This paper is externally set and externally assessed. It assesses, through a number of questions, the students’ ability to read a range of texts. The text booklet consists of four texts. The question and answer booklet contains questions on those texts. The student’s understanding of the written texts is assessed, not the student’s knowledge of the topic.

All texts and questions are in the target language and all responses must be written in the target language.

The following list, which is not exhaustive, gives some text types with which students are encouraged to be familiar. These may be presented in electronic format.

  • Article, column
  • Blog
  • Brochure, leaflet, flyer, pamphlet, advertisement
  • Essay
  • Interview in any form
  • News report
  • Report
  • Review
  • Set of instructions, guidelines
  • Written correspondence
Text-handling exercises

Questions assess a range of receptive skills such as understanding overall meaning, scanning texts for particular details, and understanding structural features.

These are the types of questions that may appear in paper 1.

  • Gap-filling exercises based on comprehension of the text
  • Identifying precise references of key phrases or structures (for example, “In line x, to whom does the word ‘they’ refer?”)
  • Identifying related ideas that are in different parts of the text
  • Identifying specific content items
  • Identifying true sentences according to the text
  • Identifying whether an explanation or definition is true or false, and finding the evidence for this in the text
  • Identifying who says what in a text or a series of short texts
  • Matching summary sentences with different paragraphs of the text
  • Matching words or phrases from the text with definitions
  • Multiple-choice questions
  • Short-answer questions

Paper 2: Written productive skills

Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Weighting: 25%

Paper 2 is based on the options: cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, science and technology.

This paper is externally set and externally assessed. It consists of five tasks requiring different types of texts. Each task is based on a different option, from which the student chooses one. The student is expected to write 250–400 words.

The aim of this component is to assess the student’s ability to communicate in writing for a variety of purposes. It requires the student to demonstrate his or her productive skills. Students’ factual knowledge of the options will not be tested as such, but can, and should, be used to support what the student wishes to communicate.

Each task requires an answer with a specific text type, such as a formal letter or a report. To this end, students need to identify the purpose(s) of the task in order to use register and style appropriate to the text type.

Students should:

  • use language accurately and appropriately
  • develop and organize ideas relevant to the task
  • produce the features of the required text type correctly.

Paper 2 requires students to produce text types from the following list.

  • Article
  • Blog/diary entry
  • Brochure, leaflet, flyer, pamphlet, advertisement
  • Essay
  • Interview
  • Introduction to debate, speech, talk, presentation
  • News report
  • Official report
  • Review
  • Set of instructions, guidelines
  • Written correspondence

Written assignment: Receptive and written productive skills

Weighting: 20%

This component consists of intertextual reading linked to the core, followed by a written exercise of 300–400 words and a 100-word rationale. It is undertaken during the second year of the course and is externally assessed.

Objectives

The purpose of the written assignment is to provide the student with the chance to reflect upon and develop further understanding of a core topic, as well as to develop intertextual receptive and productive skills. “Intertextual reading” refers to the ability to read across different texts that may be linked by a common theme.

The assignment

The assignment has two parts: the task and a rationale.

The task: Students produce a piece of writing that may be chosen from the recommended text types listed for paper 2 in this section. The subject of the assignment should have a specific focus, suitable for a piece of writing of 300–400 words in length. The content must be linked to one of the core topics and based on the information gathered from the three sources—such as articles, blogs and interviews—selected by the teacher. The length of each source must be 300–400 words.

The rationale: Students must write a 100-word rationale introducing the assignment, stating their aim(s) and how their aim(s) have been achieved.

The following example is for English B.

Global issues

People trafficking into the UK

  1. Interview with a victim of trafficking
  2. Newspaper article on immigration authorities’ intervention in a border control centre
  3. Brochure of a charity that helps illegal immigrants

(These sources will not have been previously read in class.)

Modern slavery

Interview

“Crossing the Channel”

An explanation of the reasons for choosing the topic and text type

The assessment of the task emphasizes content and organization over format. The student should demonstrate understanding of the subject matter of the written assignment, as well as the ability to organize and use the information from the sources.

The student should:

  • demonstrate understanding of the core topic
  • organize the information from the sources in a manner appropriate to the text
  • use the information from the sources to form a new text without copying
  • use language appropriate to the text type and purpose.
Formal guidelines
  • The subject of the written assignment must be the choice of the student in consultation with the teacher, based on the three sources selected by the teacher.
  • This assignment should be written in the second year of the course and must be completed during school hours under teacher supervision.
  • The written assignment and the rationale must be in the target language and handwritten.
  • It must be the independent work of the student (with the teacher’s guidance).
  • Source material must be originally written in the target language and available online (when possible). This information will be entered on the coversheet. The teacher must keep a hard copy of the three sources used for this assignment, which may be requested by the IB.
  • The use of dictionary and reference material is permitted.
  • The suggested time to complete the task is three to four hours, which does not need to be in one sitting. This timing includes the reading of the sources, the writing of a draft and of the final text and rationale. If the assignment will not be completed in one sitting, the teacher must collect the work after each session and return it to the students at the beginning of the next one.
  • The written assignment will be accompanied by:
    • a coversheet signed by both student and teacher. On this coversheet the teacher will provide the web address for any source material that is available online or a bibliography, the titles of the sources and a brief summary of each
    • a rationale.
The role of the teacher

The teacher will select previously unseen reading sources: three texts linked to each other by a core topic. Each text must be 300–400 words. The sources can be edited in order to comply with the length requirements.

The teacher must provide a summary of the texts on which the assignment is based, according to the instructions found in the Handbook of procedures for the Diploma Programme.

The assignment should be defined with the teacher’s guidance to ensure that it is an original choice of task, that it complies with the requirements of the assignment, and that the subject is not repeated by another student.

It is not the role of the teacher to provide written comments or to correct the written assignment. After liaising with the student to select an appropriate subject, the teacher should not comment on or correct the assignment, which should be entirely the student’s own work.

Teachers should familiarize the students with the assessment criteria.

External assessment criteria—SL

Overview

Paper 1

Markschemes are used to assess paper 1, which is worth 25% of the overall mark.

Paper 2

Assessment criteria are used to assess paper 2, which is worth 25% of the overall mark.

There are three assessment criteria.

Criterion A

Language

10 marks

Criterion B

Message

10 marks

Criterion C

Format

5 marks

Total

25 marks

Written assignment

Assessment criteria are used to assess the written assignment, which is worth 20% of the overall mark.

There are four assessment criteria.

Criterion A

Language

8 marks

Criterion B

Content

10 marks

Criterion C

Format

4 marks

Criterion D

Rationale

3 marks

Total

25 marks

Paper 2: Written productive skills (SL)

Criterion A: Language
  • How effectively and accurately does the student use language?

Failure to write the minimum number of words will result in a 1-mark penalty.

0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1–2

Command of the language is generally inadequate.

A very limited range of vocabulary is used, with many basic errors.

Simple sentence structures are rarely clear.

3–4

Command of the language is limited and generally ineffective.

A limited range of vocabulary is used, with many basic errors.

Simple sentence structures are sometimes clear.

5–6

Command of the language is generally adequate, despite many inaccuracies.

A fairly limited range of vocabulary is used, with many errors.

Simple sentence structures are usually clear.

7–8

Command of the language is effective, despite some inaccuracies.

A range of vocabulary is used accurately, with some errors.

Simple sentence structures are clear.

9–10

Command of the language is good and effective.

A wide range of vocabulary is used accurately, with few significant errors.

Some complex sentence structures are clear and effective.

Criterion B: Message
  • How clearly can the student develop and organize relevant ideas?

0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1–2

The message has not been communicated.

The ideas are irrelevant and/or repetitive.

The development of ideas is unclear; supporting details are very limited and/or not appropriate.

3–4

The message has barely been communicated.

The ideas are sometimes irrelevant and/or repetitive.

The development of ideas is confusing; supporting details are limited and/or not appropriate.

5–6

The message has been partially communicated.

The ideas are relevant to some extent.

The development of ideas is evident at times; supporting details are sometimes appropriate.

7–8

The message has been communicated fairly well.

The ideas are mostly relevant.

The development of ideas is coherent; supporting details are mostly appropriate.

9–10

The message has been communicated well.

The ideas are relevant.

The development of ideas is coherent and effective; supporting details are appropriate.

Criterion C: Format
  • How correctly does the student produce the required text type?
  • To what extent are the conventions of text types appropriate?

0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1

The text type is not recognizable.

Conventions appropriate to the text type are not used.

2

The text type is hardly recognizable or is not appropriate.

Conventions appropriate to the text type are very limited.

3

The text type is sometimes recognizable and appropriate.

Conventions appropriate to the text type are limited.

4

The text type is generally recognizable and appropriate.

Conventions appropriate to the text type are evident.

5

The text type is clearly recognizable and appropriate.

Conventions appropriate to the text type are effective and evident.

Written assignment: Receptive and written productive skills (SL)

Criterion A: Language
  • How effectively and accurately does the student use language?

Failure to write the minimum number of words will result in a 1-mark penalty.

0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1–2

Command of the language is generally inadequate.

A very limited range of vocabulary is used, with many basic errors.

Sentence structures are rarely clear.

3–4

Command of the language is limited and generally ineffective.

A limited range of vocabulary is used, with many basic errors.

Sentence structures are sometimes clear.

5–6

Command of the language is generally adequate, despite many inaccuracies.

A fairly limited range of vocabulary is used, with many errors.

Sentence structures are usually clear.

7–8

Command of the language is effective, despite some inaccuracies.

A range of vocabulary is used accurately, with some errors.

Sentence structures are clear.

Criterion B: Content
  • How well has the student used the sources to achieve the aim(s) stated in the rationale?
  • How skillfully are the sources used for the task?
  • How well organized is the information gathered from the sources?

0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1–2

The student makes little use of the sources and has not fulfilled the aim(s) stated in the rationale.

Use of the sources is superficial or poorly developed.

There is no evidence of organization.

3–4

The student makes some use of the sources and partially fulfills the aim(s) stated in the rationale.

Use of the sources is basic, though at least relevant.

There is an attempt at organization.

5–6

The student makes use of the sources and generally fulfills the aim(s) stated in the rationale.

Use of the sources is adequate.

There is some organization.

7–8

The student makes good use of the sources and mostly fulfills the aim(s) stated in the rationale.

Use of the sources is good.

The work is mostly organized.

9–10

The student makes effective use of the sources and fulfills the aim(s) stated in the rationale.

Use of the sources is effective.

The work is organized.

Criterion C: Format
  • How correctly does the student produce the required text type?
  • To what extent are the conventions of text types appropriate?

0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1

The text type is not recognizable.

Conventions appropriate to the text type are not used.

2

The text type is hardly recognizable or is not appropriate.

Conventions appropriate to the text type are limited.

3

The text type is sometimes recognizable and appropriate.

Conventions appropriate to the text type are evident.

4

The text type is clearly recognizable and appropriate.

Conventions appropriate to the text type are effective and evident.

Criterion D: Rationale
  • How clear and convincing is the rationale?

0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1

The rationale is not clear.

2

The rationale is clear to some extent.

3

The rationale is clear and directly linked to the sources.

External assessment details—HL

Paper 1: Receptive skills

Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Weighting: 25%

Paper 1 is based on the core: communication and media, global issues, social relationships.

This paper is externally set and externally assessed. It assesses, through a number of questions, the students’ ability to read a range of texts. The text booklet consists of five texts. The question and answer booklet contains questions on those texts. The students’ understanding and interpretation of the written texts are assessed, not the students’ knowledge of the topic.

Knowledge of vocabulary relevant to the topic is expected. Although the format of the paper is similar at both SL and HL, the overall reading material is longer and more complex at HL, in keeping with the aims of the language B course.

All texts and questions are in the target language and all responses must be written in the target language.

The following list, which is not exhaustive, gives some text types with which students are expected to be familiar. These may be presented in electronic format.

  • Article, column
  • Blog
  • Brochure, leaflet, flyer, pamphlet, advertisement
  • Essay
  • Interview in any form
  • News report
  • Report
  • Review
  • Set of instructions, guidelines
  • Short story, novel, poem
  • Written correspondence
Text-handling exercises

Questions assess a range of receptive skills such as understanding of overall meaning, scanning texts for particular details, understanding structural features (for example, cross references), functioning in context, and identifying communicative purposes. At HL the student’s understanding and interpretation (but not analysis) of literature are assessed.

These are the types of questions that may appear in paper 1.

  • Choosing which of a number of sentences are true according to the text
  • Gap-filling exercises based on comprehension of the text
  • Identifying clear inference from concepts (for example, “The text says that 60% of people think x. What does this mean with regards to the remaining 40%?”)
  • Identifying precise references of key phrases or structures (for example, “In line x, to whom does the word ‘they’ refer?”)
  • Identifying related ideas that are in different parts of the text
  • Identifying specific content items
  • Identifying whether an explanation or definition is true or false, and finding the evidence for this in the text
  • Identifying who says what in a text or a series of short texts
  • Justifying an interpretation by locating evidence or key phrases (for example, “Where does the author say xxx?”)
  • Matching summary sentences with different paragraphs of the text
  • Matching words or phrases from the text with definitions
  • Multiple-choice questions
  • Short-answer questions

Paper 2: Written productive skills

Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Weighting: 25%

Paper 2 is externally set and externally assessed. It consists of two sections.

  • Section A (250–400 words): Based on the options—cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure, science and technology
  • Section B (150–250 words): Based on the core—communication and media, global issues, social relationships

The aim of this component is to assess the student’s ability to communicate accurately in writing for a variety of purposes. It requires the student to demonstrate his or her productive skills.

Section A

This section of the paper consists of five tasks requiring different types of texts. Each task is based on a different option, from which the student chooses one.

Students’ factual knowledge of the options will not be tested as such, but can, and should, be used to support what the student wishes to communicate.

Each task requires an answer with a specific text type, such as a formal letter or a report. To this end, students need to identify the purpose(s) of the task in order to use register and style appropriate to the text type.

Students should:

  • use language accurately and appropriately
  • develop and organize ideas relevant to the task
  • produce the features of the required text type correctly.

Section A requires students to produce text types from the following list.

  • Article
  • Blog/diary entry
  • Brochure, leaflet, flyer, pamphlet, advertisement
  • Interview
  • Introduction to debate, speech, talk, presentation
  • News report
  • Official report
  • Proposal
  • Review
  • Set of instructions, guidelines
  • Written correspondence
Section B

The student writes a reasoned argument in the form of a response to a stimulus text dealing with a topic linked to the core. The text could be a news report or a comment by a public figure. The response should engage with details of the text in order to develop some coherent discussion of the topic area, which is informed by what has been learned during the study of the core. There is no prescribed answer—what is assessed is the student’s ability to express his or her reflection on, or personal response to, the stimulus.

Written assignment: Receptive and written productive skills

Weighting: 20%

This component consists of a creative writing task of 500–600 words linked to one of the two works of literature read in class and a 150-word rationale. It is undertaken during the second year of the course and is externally assessed.

Objectives

The purpose of the written assignment is to provide the student with the chance to reflect upon and develop further understanding of one of the literary works read in class, as well as to develop their receptive and productive skills to a higher degree.

The assignment

The assignment has two parts: the task and a rationale.

The task: Students produce a piece of creative writing that may be chosen from the recommended text types listed for paper 2 in this section. It will be based on a work of literature that the student has read as part of the course and may use related information from other reading material. The task must be 500–600 words in length. Examples of written assignments could be writing a new ending to a novel, interviewing a character, or a diary entry by one of the characters in a story or play.

The rationale: Students must write a 150-word rationale introducing the assignment, stating their aim(s) and how their aim(s) have been achieved.

Short story

Dialogue with a character from the short story

Interview

Introducing the assignment and objectives of the task and offering a brief summary of the literary work

The student should:

  • use effectively a range of language appropriate to text type and purpose
  • create a piece of writing that is connected to the literary work
  • handle the selected text type effectively.
Formal guidelines
  • The subject of the written assignment must be the choice of the student in consultation with the teacher.
  • This assignment should be written in the second year of the course and must be completed during school hours under teacher supervision.
  • The written assignment and the rationale must be in the target language and handwritten.
  • It must be the independent work of the student (with the teacher’s guidance).
  • The literary work must be written originally in the target language and studied in the target language.
  • The use of dictionary and reference material is permitted.
  • The suggested time to complete the task is three to four hours, which does not need to be in one sitting. This timing includes organizing the task, the writing of a draft and of the final text and rationale.
  • The written assignment will be accompanied by:
    • a coversheet signed by both student and teacher. On this coversheet the teacher will provide the title and author of the work used and a brief summary of it
    • a rationale
    • a bibliography in standard format with references to all sources.
The role of the teacher

The assignment should be defined with the teacher’s guidance to ensure that it is an original choice of task, that it complies with the requirements of the assignment, and that the subject is not repeated by another student.

It is not the role of the teacher to provide written comments or to correct the written assignment. After liaising with the student to select an appropriate subject, the teacher should not comment on or correct the assignment, which should be entirely the student’s own work.

Teachers should familiarize the students with the assessment criteria.

External assessment criteria—HL

Overview

Paper 1

Markschemes are used to assess paper 1, which is worth 25% of the overall mark.

Paper 2

Assessment criteria are used to assess paper 2, which is worth 25% of the overall mark.

Section A

There are three assessment criteria.

Criterion A

Language

10 marks

Criterion B

Message

10 marks

Criterion C

Format

5 marks

Total

25 marks

Section B

There are two assessment criteria.

Criterion A

Language

10 marks

Criterion B

Argument

10 marks

Total

20 marks

Written assignment

Assessment criteria are used to assess the written assignment, which is worth 20% of the overall mark.

There are four assessment criteria.

Criterion A

Language

8 marks

Criterion B

Content

10 marks

Criterion C

Format

4 marks

Criterion D

Rationale

3 marks

Total

25 marks

Paper 2: Written productive skills—section A (HL)

Criterion A: Language
  • How effectively and accurately does the student use language?

Failure to write the minimum number of words will result in a 1-mark penalty.

0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1–2

Command of the language is limited and generally ineffective.

A limited range of vocabulary is used, with many basic errors.

Simple sentence structures are sometimes clear.

3–4

Command of the language is generally adequate, despite many inaccuracies.

A fairly limited range of vocabulary is used, with many errors.

Simple sentence structures are usually clear.

5–6

Command of the language is effective, despite some inaccuracies.

A range of vocabulary is used accurately, with some errors.

Simple sentence structures are clear.

7–8

Command of the language is good and effective.

A wide range of vocabulary is used accurately, with few significant errors.

Some complex sentence structures are clear and effective.

9–10

Command of the language is very effective.

A wide range of vocabulary is used accurately and effectively, with very few errors.

Complex sentence structures are clear and effective

Criterion B: Message
  • How clearly can the student develop and organize relevant ideas?

0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1–2

The message has not been communicated.

The ideas are irrelevant and/or repetitive.

The development of ideas is confusing; supporting details are limited and/or not appropriate.

3–4

The message has been partially communicated.

The ideas are relevant to some extent.

The development of ideas is evident at times; supporting details are sometimes appropriate.

5–6

The message has been communicated fairly well.

The ideas are mostly relevant.

The development of ideas is coherent; supporting details are mostly appropriate.

7–8

The message has been communicated well.

The ideas are relevant.

The development of ideas is coherent and effective; supporting details are appropriate.

9–10

The message has been communicated very well.

The ideas are relevant and effective.

The development of ideas is coherent and thorough; supporting details are highly appropriate.

Criterion C: Format
  • How correctly does the student produce the required text type?
  • To what extent are the conventions of text types appropriate?
 

French B SL –NEW Written Assignment (Receptive and written productive skills – !" to #""words rationale $ %""& '"" words ased on one o) the core*

A: Rationale and Task (/10)

How well does the student use the rationale and the task in order to accomplish the assignment?

How clearlyhas the task been introduced in the rationale?

How successfully does the task achieve the aim(s) stated in the rationale? How appropriate is the choice of the text type to the task?

Marks0

The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.

1-2

The student uses the rationale and the task in a limited way and may have partially

accomplished the assignment.There is little reference to the sources in the rationale.The student has barely explained what his or her aim(s) are.The subject is hardly relevant to the chosen sources and not addressed in the task.The chosen text type is inappropriate to the audience and aim(s) stated in the rationale.

3-4

The student uses the rationale and the task in order to accomplish the assignment

to a certain extent.There is some reference to some of the sources in the rationale.The student has explained what his or her aims are but not how heshe intends to achieve them.The subject stated in the rationale is partially relevant to the chosen sources or not

addressed throughout the task.The chosen text type is not completely appropriate to the audience and aim(s) stated in

the rationale! and is applied inconsistently throughout the task.

5-6

The student uses the rationale and the task ade"uately in order to accomplish the

assignment.#ll sources have been referred to but not necessarily described in the rationale.The student has explained what his or her aims are and how heshe intends to achieve

them.The subject stated in the rationale is generally relevant to the chosen sources and

addressed throughout the task.The chosen text type is not completely appropriate to the audience and purpose stated inthe rationale! but is applied consistently throughout the task.

7-8

The student uses the rationale and the task wellin order to accomplish the

assignment.#ll sources have been described in the rationale.The student has clearly explained what his or her aim(s) are and how heshe intends to

achieve them.The subject stated in the rationale is relevant to the chosen sources and addressed

throughout the task.The chosen text type is appropriate to the audience and purpose stated in the rationale!

and is applied throughout the task.

9-10

The student uses the rationale and the task e$ectively in order to accomplish the

assignment.#ll sources have been fully described in the rationale.The student has clearly explained what his or her aim(s) are and how heshe intends to

achieve them.The subject stated in the rationale is focused! relevant to the chosen sources and

consistently addressed throughout the task.The chosen text type is appropriate to the audience and purpose stated in the rationale! and is applied consistently throughout the task.

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “Ib French B Hl Written Assignments”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *