James Baldwin Essay On Writing

March on Washington, 1963. With Marlon Brando, Charlton Heston, Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier.

James Baldwin was an eminent essayist, novelist, and playwright – but he was also a master of the Q&A interview. Perhaps his 1984 Paris Review interview was his best, with interviewers Jordan Elgrably and George Plimpton (read the whole thing here). We include some excerpts below.

May this post serve as a reminder that this Thursday, March 5, at 7:30 p.m., the Another Look book club will feature a discussion of Baldwin’s incendiary The Fire Next Time (1963) at the Bechtel Conference Center at Encina Hall at 616 Serra Street on the Stanford campus. Another Look discussions are free and open to the public, with no reserved seating. The discussion will be moderated by Michele Elam, professor of English, with Harry Elam, vice provost for undergraduate education, and acclaimed author Tobias Wolff, professor of English and the founding director of Another Look. Michele Elam is a widely published authority on race and culture; Harry Elam is a leading scholar of African American theater and performance.

Now here are the excerpts from The Paris Review.  In the first passage, the interview asks Baldwin about his flight to France, where he eventually died at his home in Saint-Paul de Vence in 1987:

INTERVIEWER: Why did you choose France?

BALDWIN: It wasn’t so much a matter of choosing France—it was a matter of getting out of America. I didn’t know what was going to happen to me in France but I knew what was going to happen to me in New York. If I had stayed there, I would have gone under, like my friend on the George Washington Bridge.

INTERVIEWER: You say the city beat him to death. You mean that metaphorically.

BALDWIN: Not so metaphorically. Looking for a place to live. Looking for a job. You begin to doubt your judgment, you begin to doubt everything. You become imprecise. And that’s when you’re beginning to go under. You’ve been beaten, and it’s been deliberate. The whole society has decided to make you nothing. And they don’t even know they’re doing it.

INTERVIEWER: Has writing been a type of salvation?

BALDWIN: I’m not so sure! I’m not sure I’ve escaped anything. One still lives with it, in many ways. It’s happening all around us, every day. It’s not happening to me in the same way, because I’m James Baldwin; I’m not riding the subways and I’m not looking for a place to live. But it’s still happening. So salvation is a difficult word to use in such a context. I’ve been compelled in some ways by describing my circumstances to learn to live with them. It’s not the same thing as accepting them.

INTERVIEWER: Was there an instant you knew you were going to write, to be a writer rather than anything else?

“Claim it all – including Shakespeare.” (Photo: Allan Warren)

BALDWIN: Yes. The death of my father. Until my father died I thought I could do something else. I had wanted to be a musician, thought of being a painter, thought of being an actor. This was all before I was nineteen. … My father didn’t think it was possible—he thought I’d get killed, get murdered. … He died when his last child was born and I realized I had to make a jump—a leap. I’d been a preacher for three years, from age fourteen to seventeen. Those were three years which probably turned me to writing.

INTERVIEWER: Were the sermons you delivered from the pulpit very carefully prepared, or were they absolutely off the top of your head?

BALDWIN: I would improvise from the texts, like a jazz musician improvises from a theme. I never wrote a sermon—I studied the texts. I’ve never written a speech. I can’t read a speech. It’s kind of give-and-take. You have to sense the people you’re talking to. You have to respond to what they hear.

INTERVIEWER: Do you have a reader in your mind when you write?

BALDWIN: No, you can’t have that.

INTERVIEWER: So it’s quite unlike preaching?

BALDWIN: Entirely. The two roles are completely unattached. When you are standing in the pulpit, you must sound as though you know what you’re talking about. When you’re writing, you’re trying to find out something which you don’t know. The whole language of writing for me is finding out what you don’t want to know, what you don’t want to find out. But something forces you to anyway. …

INTERVIEWER: Was there anyone to guide you?

Baldwin’s teacher – or one of them.

BALDWIN: I remember standing on a street corner with the black painter Beauford Delaney down in the Village, waiting for the light to change, and he pointed down and said, “Look.” I looked and all I saw was water. And he said, “Look again,” which I did, and I saw oil on the water and the city reflected in the puddle. It was a great revelation to me. I can’t explain it. He taught me how to see, and how to trust what I saw. Painters have often taught writers how to see. And once you’ve had that experience, you see differently.

INTERVIEWER: Do you think painters would help a fledgling writer more than another writer might? Did you read a great deal?

BALDWIN: I read everything. I read my way out of the two libraries in Harlem by the time I was thirteen. One does learn a great deal about writing this way. First of all, you learn how little you know. It is true that the more one learns the less one knows. I’m still learning how to write. I don’t know what technique is. All I know is that you have to make the reader see it. This I learned from Dostoevsky, from Balzac.

***

INTERVIEWER: “One writes out of one thing only—one’s own experience,” you’ve said.

BALDWIN: Yes, and yet one’s own experience is not necessarily one’s twenty-four-hour reality. Everything happens to you, which is what Whitman means when he says in his poem “Heroes,” “I am the man, I suffered, I was there.” It depends on what you mean by experience.

***

INTERVIEWER: You were in utter despair after the death of Martin Luther King Jr. Did you find it difficult to write then, or do you work better out of anguish?

BALDWIN: No one works better out of anguish at all; that’s an incredible literary conceit. I didn’t think I could write at all. I didn’t see any point to it. I was hurt . . . I can’t even talk about it. I didn’t know how to continue, didn’t see my way clear.

***

INTERVIEWER: Is there a big shifting of gears between writing fiction and writing nonfiction?

BALDWIN: Shifting gears, you ask. Every form is difficult, no one is easier than another. They all kick your ass. None of it comes easy. …

INTERVIEWER: But the essay is a little bit simpler, isn’t it, because you’re angry about something which you can put your finger on . . .

“I was hurt … I can’t even talk about it.”

BALDWIN: An essay is not simpler, though it may seem so. An essay is essentially an argument. The writer’s point of view in an essay is always absolutely clear. The writer is trying to make the readers see something, trying to convince them of something. In a novel or a play you’re trying to show them something. The risks, in any case, are exactly the same.

INTERVIEWER: What are your first drafts like?

BALDWIN: They are overwritten. Most of the rewrite, then, is cleaning. Don’t describe it, show it. That’s what I try to teach all young writers—take it out! Don’t describe a purple sunset, make me see that it is purple.

INTERVIEWER: As your experience about writing accrues, what would you say increases with knowledge?

BALDWIN: You learn how little you know. It becomes much more difficult because the hardest thing in the world is simplicity. And the most fearful thing, too. It becomes more difficult because you have to strip yourself of all your disguises, some of which you didn’t know you had. You want to write a sentence as clean as a bone. That is the goal.

***

INTERVIEWER: Yes, before 1968, you said, “I love America.”

BALDWIN: Long before then. I still do, though that feeling has changed in the face of it. I think that it is a spiritual disaster to pretend that one doesn’t love one’s country. You may disapprove of it, you may be forced to leave it, you may live your whole life as a battle, yet I don’t think you can escape it. There isn’t any other place to go—you don’t pull up your roots and put them down someplace else. At least not in a single lifetime, or, if you do, you’ll be aware of precisely what it means, knowing that your real roots are always elsewhere. If you try to pretend you don’t see the immediate reality that formed you I think you’ll go blind. … I believe what one has to do as a black American is to take white history, or history as written by whites, and claim it all—including Shakespeare.

 


Tags: Beauford Delany, Fyodor Dostoevsky, James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, William Shakespeare

This entry was posted on Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015 at 6:12 pm by Cynthia Haven and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

James Baldwin's Writing Technique Essay

The Baldwin Technique

James Baldwin is highly regarded as one of the great writers of his time. In the “Notes of a Native Son” he describes a very influential moment in his life. The essay’s setting takes place during the Harlem riots in New York City and Detroit. The riot in New York all began due the fatal shooting of a young African American boy by a white police officer. Protesters began to protest the police brutality, but then fights and looting broke out when some protesters became unruly. Baldwin’s essay reflects upon his interactions and feelings with and about his father. He analyzes how his father affected him and talks about what kind of person his father was. He also reflects on the impact of his father’s death. All the while, within the essay, Baldwin uses different techniques in order to obtain and intrigue his readers. He primarily makes his essay a narrative. However, he also incorporates his analysis, which usually stem from his use of binaries and contrasts. His use of repetitive words also plays a big part in his style. All of those techniques all intertwined in a way that will help the reader understand Baldwin and his ideas a lot clearer. His combination of both narrative and analysis can be viewed in the very first paragraph.

Baldwin begins his essay by stating that fact that his father died on the July 29, 1943. Right after stating that fact, he mentions the rioting, which occurred in Detroit and in Harlem about a month before the death of his father. Baldwin incorporates the events that are going on around him in his narrative as a way to set up the environment for the reader. The rioting and other events that Baldwin speaks of is his way of explaining, or even rationalizing his feelings during that time period. In the first section towards the end of the section, Baldwin admits that he “wanted to do something to crush these white faces, which were crushing me”. (71) Baldwin said this as a result of his altercation with white waitress in a restaurant who refused to serve him. This hatred and ill feeling that he felt was very similar to the feelings that the rioters felt toward the police and their acts of unnecessary brutality. Baldwin mentions the riots through out the story because he, himself, can associate with them. The feelings that the rioters had against the police were similar to the feelings that Baldwin had toward white people and his father. So in essence, Baldwin uses the public events that are going on in order to compare to what is going on in his own private life. The rioters and police recapitulate the association that Baldwin had with his father.

The conflict that the rioters and the police shared were quite similar to the relationship that Baldwin and his father had. In a way, he is also constructing a type of connection between the riots and his relationship with himself and his father. This is an example of how Baldwin utilizes binaries. When reading Baldwin’s literature, one can come...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Research paper: James Baldwin

1435 words - 6 pages Kolstedt PAGE \* MERGEFORMAT 1 Stephen KolstedtProf Tree BernsteinEng. V01B23 November 2011James BaldwinThe author James Arthur Baldwin (1924-1987) achieved recognition for his courageous expressions of African American life in the United States. His first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, was an...

Art for Art's Sake: discusses the views of James Baldwin and Ralph Waldo Emerson Ellison regarding the role experience and social agenda do/should play in the creation of art.

635 words - 3 pages A great 20th century author once said, "our humanity is our burden" (23). It is this encumbrance, however, that shapes the literature of two of the most powerful and influential authors of this era, Ralph Ellison and James Baldwin. Though they have opposing views on the role experience and...

James Baldwin’s Visions Of America and Richard Rodriguez’s Hunger of Memory

3486 words - 14 pages James Baldwin’s Visions Of America and Richard Rodriguez’s Hunger of Memory       Many immigrant and minority narratives concentrate their efforts on the positive side of the American dream. These particular stories narrate a person's struggle and rise through the ranks of the Am6rican hierarchy focusing on the opportunities that seem to abound in this country. While these stories are well and good. they do seem to soft peddle the flip...

Notes of a Native Son

1582 words - 6 pages America: love it or leave it" was a popular slogan in the 1960s. Plastered on signs and bumper stickers, the phrase was a response to the people, most of them young college students, who loudly and angrily protested America's involvement in Vietnam, inviting the wrath of those who believed that one's country deserved the unconditional support of the citizenry no matter how questionable the actions of the government. Two decades earlier,...

"Go Tell It On The Mountain", by James Baldwin.

695 words - 3 pages Go Tell It On The Mountain, by James Baldwin, is enriched with Biblical references that bring to mind the spirit of the black Church and a realism that brings you back to Harlem in the 1930s. Throughout the book, the Grimes family turns to the Church in times of despair. These indications of God...

James Bladwin and Notes of A Native Son

693 words - 3 pages Throughout the history of the United States, communities of all races and religions have been bombarded with activists and modern-day intellectuals expressing their points of view on the plagues of society today. Some of these activists are independent soft-spoken conservatives while others are wild ill-willed extremist trying to press for their cause no matter what harm.

Rage in Baldwin's Stranger in the Village

628 words - 3 pages Rage in Baldwin's Stranger in the Village The rage of the disesteemed is personally fruitless, but it is also absolutely inevitable; this rage, so generally discounted, so little understood even among the people whose daily bread it is, is one of the things that makes history. -- James Baldwin, ?Stranger in the Village? (130) In his essay 'Stranger in the Village' (1955), many of James Baldwin?s innermost feelings are exposed to...

James Baldwin and Malcolm X.

932 words - 4 pages Throughout the history of the United States, communities of all races and religions have been bombarded with activists and modern-day intellectuals expressing there points of view on the plagues of society today. Some of these activists are independent soft spoken conservatives while others are wild ill-willed extremist trying to press for there cause no matter what harm. The late

The Inevitability of Suffering in James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues

874 words - 3 pages The Inevitability of Suffering in James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues Everyone likes to feel safe. We try to protect ourselves and those we love, to make them feel safe as well. The idea conveyed about safety in James Baldwin's "Sonny's Blues" is that there is no such thing. The narrator of this story had thought that his brother Sonny was safe. Or at least, that was what he had made himself believe. "I told myself that Sonny was wild, but he...

James Baldwin

1356 words - 5 pages James Baldwin grew up as one of many sons from a poor African American family and was pressed to become a preacher like his father. Throughout his childhood, like most blacks, he suffered much prejudice because of his skin color. However, this only made him stronger. On the day of his father's funeral, he witnessed the great Harlem race riot. This act of violence and...

Mending the Relationship of Two Brothers in James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues

1270 words - 5 pages Mending the Relationship of Two Brothers in James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues According to Liukkonen, James Baldwin is well known for his "novels on sexual and personal identity, and sharp essays on civil-rights struggle in the United States." "Sonny's Blues" is no exception to this. The story takes place in Harlem, New York in the 1950's and tells of the relationship between two brothers. The older brother, who is the narrator and a participant...

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “James Baldwin Essay On Writing”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *